TEAM SEAFOODS.COM BLOG


Just in Time for the Holidays

Same Box. Same Plate. Completely Different Surf & Turf!

Kerwee Wagyu

The Tajiri or Tajima line is formed in the Kansai region, especially in the prefecture of Hyogo. Originally the animals were used as draft animals. This circumstance led to a greater development of the forequarters compared to the hindquarters. Tajima cattle are generally small framed and have lower growth rates, but the meat quality, in regards to marbling grade and tenderness, is excellent. The Tajima line is considered the most efficient line for producing high-quality meat. Our main focus is on genetic material from this line. These Tajima Cattle are grown in Australia. Kerwee Wagyu is trimmed tightly and has a unique flavor and umami. Menu Kerwee for unique Wagyu in your area. Set your restaurant apart from other Wagyu offerings. Grade: Red (BMS 4-5), Silver (BMS 6-7), Black (BMS 8-9), Kiwami (BMS 9+).

Kerwee

Australian King Prawn

For superior quality and full taste, Spencer Gulf King Prawns are renowned throughout the world as the premium species of prawn. Spencer Gulf King Prawns are wild caught straight from the cold clean waters of the Spencer Gulf, full of natural flavor. The Spencer Gulf prawn fishery leads the way in environmentally sustainable fishing practices, which is now being role-modelled worldwide. Recently this was acknowledged through being awarded Marine Stewardship Council Certification. Spencer Gulf King Prawns are an Australian product, caught and packed in Australia. The highest level of quality control is maintained, ensuring presentation, flavor, and product life is preserved. With monster U8, U10 and 10/15 sizes available, these prawns can definitely set your menu apart.
Prawn Ausralian King
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Chef Hugo Ortega

Chef Hugo OrtegaChef Hugo Ortega Dish

Executive Chef/Co-Owner, Hugo’s and Backstreet Cafe

HOUSTON . . . Hugo Ortega, executive chef/co-owner of Hugo’s and Backstreet Cafe and a three-time finalist for James Beard Foundation Awards (2012, 2013 & 2014), was born in Mexico City, the oldest of a family of eight children. At 15, he began working at one of several Procter & Gamble factories in Mexico to help support his family.  “In Mexico, we have a saying, ‘If you’re born poor, you’ll die poor,’” says the eldest Ortega. “I knew I wanted more from my life.”

In 1984, Ortega immigrated to Houston with a cousin and a friend. He had no contacts or job leads, but was determined to make a life for himself in America.  “My family has always had a strong work ethic,” he says. “And I strongly believe that if you work hard, people will respect you.”

Slowly, step-by-step, Ortega began to set down roots in the bustling oil capitol. He shared an apartment with several friends, and followed up on leads for jobs in nearby restaurants. He was happy to find his first job, as a dishwasher, at a popular bar and nightclub. While the pay was meager, Ortega grabbed at the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of the restaurant business and find contacts to help him improve his English.

Later, he moved on to a downtown Houston restaurant as busboy during the day and, at night, he cleaned the floors in office buildings to supplement his income. “I was fortunate to have two steady-paying jobs,” recalls Ortega. When his friends in Houston planned to move to California, he opted to stay in Houston. With an unexpected turn of bad luck, Ortega found himself without work.

“It was a very bad time for me,” Ortega remembers. “Most of my friends had moved away, I was out of work and afraid that I wouldn’t be able to pay my rent.” A friend took Hugo to Backstreet Cafe, where he found employment as a dishwasher/busboy.  It was at Backstreet Cafe tat, according to the chef, “the great opportunity of my life came.”

Tracy Vaught, owner of Backstreet Cafe and Prego, was impressed with Ortega’s positive attitude and willingness to learn.  She thought he showed a great deal of promise and offered him a position on the line in the kitchen.  He worked diligently, familiarizing himself with every aspect of the kitchen and was soon promoted to the kitchen at Prego, where he worked side-by-side with Executive Chef John Watt.  Impressed by his hard work and dedication, Vaught offered to enroll Ortega in the Culinary Arts program at Houston Community College.  He jumped in with both feet.