TEAM SEAFOODS.COM BLOG

Ocean Tides – New England Oysters

Chef – New England Oysters   

 August Pearls

Oysters2

SeafoodS.com let’s you inspire the kitchen and treat your guests to the extraordinary! Each month SeafoodS.com will supplement your monthly menu planning by featuring a seasonal direct program from a specific region of the globe. Our direct programs will bring the outstanding culinary experience of each region directly to your restaurant, menu, team, and guests.

August is here and we look to the Shellfish of New England. This week we take on a vast and varied market; the Northeast Oyster. We’ll focus on the famed production locations of Canada, Maine, and Massachusetts. When you find a perfect Oyster Line Up, please contact your sales rep today to build your ideal box.

Chapter 5: Oysters

Eastern Oysters  (Crassostrea virginica)

August has no “R”. That’s okay. The rule of “R” was created before the invention of mechanical refrigeration. It made very little sense to spend more for the ice to keep the Oysters cold than the Oysters themselves. With modern systems in place, it is safe to serve oysters year-round.

Eastern Oysters of New England and Canada are as varied as the waters that they inhabit. Oysters are a unique seafood in that they possess the flavors, brine and qualities of the environment in which they are grown. The majority of New England and Canadian Oysters are farmed with the exception of a very few wild harvests. The Oysters are typically named for the beach, bay, river, sound, island, or town from which they are raised. Each with its specific signature in size, taste, shell, and shape, the Eastern Oyster can take your guests on a terrific journey up and down the New England Coast. SeafoodS.com is fortunate to offer one of the largest variety and availability in Oysters. Our Overnight Shipping allows our customers the opportunity to serve Oysters with no geographic limitations. Though we offer nearly 100 varieties from around the world, we look this week to the briny shores of New England and neighboring Canada.

Oysters

Canadian Oysters

Canadian Oysters are prized for the deep cup and typically small width. Covering the areas of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, the availability is immense. The intense brine of a Canadian Oyster is unmistakable. Here are some of Canada’s most marketable Oysters.
Malpaque – Prince Edward Island:
Grown in Malpaque Bay, these Oysters are true “Boutique”. A relatively small Oyster with a deep cup. Big brine with a significant “crunch” and a sweet clean finish.
Fancy Sweet Carraquette – New Brunswick:
Fancy Sweet is the smallest Carraquette oyster on the market place. Highly mineralized water often gives the meat a dark color but contributes to its uniqueness and fresh flavor. A “sweet” oyster by smell and equally “sweet” by taste.
Malagash – Nova Scotia:
These medium standard oysters are grown in the Malagash Basin on the north shore of Nova Scotia. In spite of the extreme northern location, growing conditions and results in these cold North Atlantic waters are terrific for this unique 3 to 3 ½ inch oyster. Malagash oysters have a mildly salty flavor with a slightly smoky, mineral finish.

Maine Oysters

Maine Oysters have the benefit of an incredibly mineral rich waterfront. Maine oysters grow slowly. While southern oysters can reach market size in a year or less, a Maine oyster needs three years minimum. A four-year-old, cold-water Maine oyster has a glorious depth of texture and flavor.
Black Bear Points – Bagaduce River:
These 3+ inch medium cup oysters are mild with a clean finish and a sun bleached shell. They are surface grown on the Bagaduce River just north of Bear Head by the growers of the Little Island Oyster. Tended by hand, the only machinery used in the raising of this oyster is a solar-powered grader/tumbler.
Pemaquid – Damariscotta River:
Grown in the deep holes of the Damariscotta River, the Pemaquid have a light and lemony flavor. Growing very large, up to 5 inches, the Pemaquid only gets more interesting as they grow.
Belon ( Ostrea edulis) North American Flats – Boothbay Harbor:
A minuscule 5,000 Belon a year are pulled in Maine and sold, making them one of the rarest oysters in the world. Rowan Jacobsen states, “these wild oysters are as powerful as any on the planet, redolent of fish and zinc and umami-not for the faint of heart.”

Massachusetts Oysters

Massachusetts Oysters rival any on the planet. The abundant salinity of its shores offer a brine and “pickle-like liveliness” that make the Massachusetts Oyster industry one of the nations most revered. Massachusetts is inherently proud of a long and rich history of Oyster production. Some harvest locations have been producing Oysters for over two centuries
Wellfleet – Wellfleet Estuary:
These 3 to 3 ½ inch oysters have always been enjoyed extensively throughout Cape Cod. Wellfleets resemble Malpeques in their light body and clean finish, but they are even saltier. A varied assortment of growing and farming methods develop an especially plump and hearty New England oyster with consistent size and shape.
Cotuit – Cotuit Bay:
A Cotuit Oyster is well-known and demanded by oyster enthusiasts in many parts of the world for its naturally briny, Cape Cod flavors and perfectly, palatable half shell size. Dating back to 1857, The Cotuit Oyster Company produces one of the oldest brand name oysters in the United States. This is the only shellfish farm operating in Cotuit Bay and is currently utilizing over 33 acres of perfect oyster growing waters. There are a number of fresh water streams, marshes and estuaries that combine with clean water from Nantucket Sound and enter Cotuit Bay through the Wianno Cut and Cotuit Channel. This is the key to providing the oysters a rich and diverse food supply.
Warren Cove – White’s Flat:
Some of the best oysters in the world grow in the unique confluence of Plymouth, Kingston, and Duxbury Bays. The result is an unimaginably refreshing oyster. Warren Cove has everything that make Massachusetts world-famous for Oyster production.

Find an Oyster: 

Click the Link below and Call SeafoodS.com for Availability and Pricing.

OYSTER LIST

Contact SeafoodS.com

Josh Adams : 704-769-2260

Josh Bogen: 704-769-2261

Mike Casagrande: 704-769-2263

Clint Dowell: 704-769-2258

Karen Harmon:  704-769-2262

Patrick Lowder: 704-769-2265

Chris Nelson: 704-769-2256

 

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