TEAM SEAFOODS.COM BLOG


Ocean Tides – Partner Spotlight

Celebrating Great Fishermen

We are ecstatic to welcome Cordova, AK Salmon Fisherman Andrew Eckley (above) to SeafoodS.com’s excellent team of providers.

Alongside Capt. Andrew, his sister Tracy and brother-in-law Justin fish daily aboard F/V Black Bird for some of the best Salmon in the waters of Alaska.

Their dear friend Mark also assists in this family fishery aboard F/V Silver Moon. A tighter group of fishermen is hard to find in the competitive industry of Salmon fishing.

Capt. Andrew’s sister is one of only four females who are fishing the sometimes brutal waters of the Cordova region. Tracey grips her son Sam as she knows that he is the future, and generational fishing is extremely important to the great folks of Alaska.

Cordova Direct Coho Salmon

About this Family Fishery
Captain Andrew and his family have been fishing the waters for a great while, and their bread was buttered on the side of cannery fish. The operation of their family relied heavily on the Tinder Vessels that accepted their catch to move to the canneries of Alaska to then be processed and distributed throughout the world. Though it was fortuitous at the time they knew that the True Day Boat “Top-of-Catch” fish were much too  beautiful  to become an emaciated, canned, and shelved grocery store item. The logistics of moving Day Boat Salmon to the lower 48 is also a competitive and daunting  industry that sometimes moves to the beat of their own drum. It may even overlook the smaller vessels who’s catch warrant better representation. That’s where another small team of passionate people come into the picture. SeafoodS.com was able to provide a logistical solution with Capt. Andrew. We were able to solve the challenges of bringing Eckley’s absolutely stellar Salmon to a fresh Day Boat market. It was a mission to finally represent the quality of his catch and offer the respect that these Salmon deserve. Capt. Andrew and his family are vertebrae in the backbone of Alaska’s Cordova region. They are the players in the game of sustainable Alaskan seafood. They are the bedrock of family business, and they are here to provide you with the Salmon that they love. We are here to simply get the Salmon from their hold to your prep table. If you like to trace your catch to the fishermen, look again to Capt. Andrew and family. From their family, to our family, to your family, Chef…
About the Fish
Coho
(Oncorhynchus kisutch)
Up now are the brilliant Coho, the Silver Salmon of Alaska. The mildly flavored Coho is a brightly colored flesh that has a leaner texture of the King Salmon. While market weights range between 6 to 8 lbs, the fish of the Cordova Direct program with Capt. Andrew consistently offers fish above 10 lbs. Larger Cohos tend to be a wider fillet and are readily apt to accept any cooking methods warranted by the chef. The slightly lowered fat content of Coho lends itself to a silky mouth feel that doesn’t over encapsulate other ingredients. It is a perfect species for house-smoked applications and house-cured representation. It finds a home on the grill, in the broiler, simply sauteed, or even sous vide. It’s vibrant coloration pops in crudo, tartare, sushi, and sashimi. Coho has a reputation as one of the best flavors in the Salmon kingdom and we excitedly offer it direct from the source. Look for availability midweek.
About the Passion
Like the culinary profession, farming and fishing is seeing the up-and-coming youth taking the reigns of a centuries old industries. I know your social media feed is loaded with pics of your favorite farmers’ fare. The generational shift has always been and will always be, but it seems more rapid in certain arenas. These transitions all have a common goal; to be recognized for the talent, effort, passion, and dedication  as quickly as possible. This is where Capt. Andrew and his family strive as well. We want the success of a hard job to be prolific and hasty for this young crew, and we wish the same for any Chef and Restaurateur. It’s no light task of running a business, and any assistance that we can provide each other raises all ships.

 

Simply Call The Team At SeafoodS.com to learn more about the Cordova Direct Coho.
Josh Adams : 704-769-2260
Josh Bogen: 704-769-2261
Mike Casagrande: 704-769-2263
Karen Harmon: 704-769-2262
Jon Flower – 704-769-2258
Patrick Lowder: 704-769-2265
Chris Nelson: 704-769-2256
Brad Rosa: 704-413-3267


Ocean Tides – New England Oysters

Chef – New England Oysters   

 August Pearls

Oysters2

SeafoodS.com let’s you inspire the kitchen and treat your guests to the extraordinary! Each month SeafoodS.com will supplement your monthly menu planning by featuring a seasonal direct program from a specific region of the globe. Our direct programs will bring the outstanding culinary experience of each region directly to your restaurant, menu, team, and guests.

August is here and we look to the Shellfish of New England. This week we take on a vast and varied market; the Northeast Oyster. We’ll focus on the famed production locations of Canada, Maine, and Massachusetts. When you find a perfect Oyster Line Up, please contact your sales rep today to build your ideal box.

Chapter 5: Oysters

Eastern Oysters  (Crassostrea virginica)

August has no “R”. That’s okay. The rule of “R” was created before the invention of mechanical refrigeration. It made very little sense to spend more for the ice to keep the Oysters cold than the Oysters themselves. With modern systems in place, it is safe to serve oysters year-round.

Eastern Oysters of New England and Canada are as varied as the waters that they inhabit. Oysters are a unique seafood in that they possess the flavors, brine and qualities of the environment in which they are grown. The majority of New England and Canadian Oysters are farmed with the exception of a very few wild harvests. The Oysters are typically named for the beach, bay, river, sound, island, or town from which they are raised. Each with its specific signature in size, taste, shell, and shape, the Eastern Oyster can take your guests on a terrific journey up and down the New England Coast. SeafoodS.com is fortunate to offer one of the largest variety and availability in Oysters. Our Overnight Shipping allows our customers the opportunity to serve Oysters with no geographic limitations. Though we offer nearly 100 varieties from around the world, we look this week to the briny shores of New England and neighboring Canada.

Oysters

Canadian Oysters

Canadian Oysters are prized for the deep cup and typically small width. Covering the areas of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, the availability is immense. The intense brine of a Canadian Oyster is unmistakable. Here are some of Canada’s most marketable Oysters.
Malpaque – Prince Edward Island:
Grown in Malpaque Bay, these Oysters are true “Boutique”. A relatively small Oyster with a deep cup. Big brine with a significant “crunch” and a sweet clean finish.
Fancy Sweet Carraquette – New Brunswick:
Fancy Sweet is the smallest Carraquette oyster on the market place. Highly mineralized water often gives the meat a dark color but contributes to its uniqueness and fresh flavor. A “sweet” oyster by smell and equally “sweet” by taste.
Malagash – Nova Scotia:
These medium standard oysters are grown in the Malagash Basin on the north shore of Nova Scotia. In spite of the extreme northern location, growing conditions and results in these cold North Atlantic waters are terrific for this unique 3 to 3 ½ inch oyster. Malagash oysters have a mildly salty flavor with a slightly smoky, mineral finish.

Maine Oysters

Maine Oysters have the benefit of an incredibly mineral rich waterfront. Maine oysters grow slowly. While southern oysters can reach market size in a year or less, a Maine oyster needs three years minimum. A four-year-old, cold-water Maine oyster has a glorious depth of texture and flavor.
Black Bear Points – Bagaduce River:
These 3+ inch medium cup oysters are mild with a clean finish and a sun bleached shell. They are surface grown on the Bagaduce River just north of Bear Head by the growers of the Little Island Oyster. Tended by hand, the only machinery used in the raising of this oyster is a solar-powered grader/tumbler.
Pemaquid – Damariscotta River:
Grown in the deep holes of the Damariscotta River, the Pemaquid have a light and lemony flavor. Growing very large, up to 5 inches, the Pemaquid only gets more interesting as they grow.
Belon ( Ostrea edulis) North American Flats – Boothbay Harbor:
A minuscule 5,000 Belon a year are pulled in Maine and sold, making them one of the rarest oysters in the world. Rowan Jacobsen states, “these wild oysters are as powerful as any on the planet, redolent of fish and zinc and umami-not for the faint of heart.”

Massachusetts Oysters

Massachusetts Oysters rival any on the planet. The abundant salinity of its shores offer a brine and “pickle-like liveliness” that make the Massachusetts Oyster industry one of the nations most revered. Massachusetts is inherently proud of a long and rich history of Oyster production. Some harvest locations have been producing Oysters for over two centuries
Wellfleet – Wellfleet Estuary:
These 3 to 3 ½ inch oysters have always been enjoyed extensively throughout Cape Cod. Wellfleets resemble Malpeques in their light body and clean finish, but they are even saltier. A varied assortment of growing and farming methods develop an especially plump and hearty New England oyster with consistent size and shape.
Cotuit – Cotuit Bay:
A Cotuit Oyster is well-known and demanded by oyster enthusiasts in many parts of the world for its naturally briny, Cape Cod flavors and perfectly, palatable half shell size. Dating back to 1857, The Cotuit Oyster Company produces one of the oldest brand name oysters in the United States. This is the only shellfish farm operating in Cotuit Bay and is currently utilizing over 33 acres of perfect oyster growing waters. There are a number of fresh water streams, marshes and estuaries that combine with clean water from Nantucket Sound and enter Cotuit Bay through the Wianno Cut and Cotuit Channel. This is the key to providing the oysters a rich and diverse food supply.
Warren Cove – White’s Flat:
Some of the best oysters in the world grow in the unique confluence of Plymouth, Kingston, and Duxbury Bays. The result is an unimaginably refreshing oyster. Warren Cove has everything that make Massachusetts world-famous for Oyster production.

Find an Oyster: 

Click the Link below and Call SeafoodS.com for Availability and Pricing.

OYSTER LIST

Contact SeafoodS.com

Josh Adams : 704-769-2260

Josh Bogen: 704-769-2261

Mike Casagrande: 704-769-2263

Clint Dowell: 704-769-2258

Karen Harmon:  704-769-2262

Patrick Lowder: 704-769-2265

Chris Nelson: 704-769-2256

 


Ocean Tides – New England Sea Scallops

Chef – New England Sea Scallops Sweeten Summer.   

 August Menu Plan.

Scallop1

SeafoodS.com let’s you inspire the kitchen and treat your guests to the extraordinary! Each month SeafoodS.com will supplement your monthly menu planning by featuring a seasonal direct program from a specific region of the globe. Our direct programs will bring the outstanding culinary experience of each region directly to your restaurant, menu, team, and guests.

August is here and we look to the Shellfish of New England. This week we delve into the gauntlet of Sea Scallops. “Gauntlet” refers to the vast availability of Sea Scallops in today’s markets. They have different size and specifications, processing treatments, harvest methods, and distribution avenues. When you encounter your ideal Sea Scallop within this piece, please contact your sales rep today to build your ideal box.

Chapter 4: Sea Scallops

Scallops Dish3

Atlantic Sea Scallop  (Placopecten magellanicus)

Atlantic Sea Scallops are some of the United States’ most prevalent Scallops on restaurant menus. Their popularity is widely recognized by chefs and diners alike. Sea Scallops market themselves, portion perfectly, elevate straight-forward ingredients, enlighten gourmet “sets”, and seduce the masses. It is a simple matter of finding the correct Sea Scallop for your particular application. Below are varied levels of Sea Scallop production that show the value in each.

Fresh Sea Scallops are graded by size and marketed by the amount of preservative added.

  • Dry Chemical Free – Unprocessed with 0% Preservative or Water Weight
  • Dry Overnight – “Dip” processing that accrues the minimal amount of additive that meets FDA “Dry” requirements – less than 18% Weight by Volume of Preservative and Water
  • Wet – “Soak” processing that accrues more than 18% Weight by Volume of Preservative and Water

Day Boat Dry

Massachusetts and Maine’s Day Boat Fresh Sea Scallops are diamonds! Day Boats utilizing small net dredging offer the “Top-of-Catch” in Sea Scallops. Their daily runs provide Sea Scallops that will never see the large processing facilities. They are offloaded, shucked, and packed for shipping right from the pier. When searching for the freshest Sashimi/Crudo grade Sea Scallops, look for Day Boat Dry. Upon cooking, Day Boat Drys have no equal. No  water loss equals no shrinkage. Their sugar concentration enables a deep golden sear while its brine still lingers. The sweet and salty balance of Sea Scallops are remarkable.  Day Boat Dry Sea Scallops represent the premier fine dining shellfish.

SeafoodS.com’s Priority Overnight delivery offers Sea Scallop meats that are hours from their shell. This the premium!

New Bedford Auction

The New Bedford Scallop Auction offers a complete array of Sea Scallops. The Lightship Fleets of New Bedford provide short trip hauls that are sorted and processed. The auction pricing reflects the Scallops’ size and the amount of “processing” received. The largest scallops with the least amount of processing gain the highest market prices.

The Dry Chemical Free Sea Scallops are either blast frozen aboard longer trip boats or shucked fresh at port. New Bedford Chemical Free Dry are the highest quality in the Auction. They are the perfect Auction Scallop for a colorful sear.

The Overnight Sea Scallops are still considered “Dry” and are the most abundant fresh Sea Scallop in restaurant distribution. They release minimal amounts of water when cooking, but require a harder sear to obtain deep color. Overnights offer a slight reduction in price per pound, but need heightened talents and techniques to bring them to their highest value on the plate.

Wet Scallops are the lowest quality and price. The price is obtained through soaking smaller Scallops in a solution of water and preservative until they amass considerable size and weight (turning a 20/30 into a 10/20). The shelf life is incredible, but you are buying a small Scallop and water. Choose a smaller Overnight or Dry to obtain the same portion cook weight, but with a much more eloquent product.

You SeafoodS.com account specialist can assist in finding the perfect Auction Sea Scallop for your recipes and preparation methods.

Build A Box:

Available to include in your Shipment!

Contact SeafoodS.com to Build your optimal Box.

Josh Adams : 704-769-2260

Josh Bogen: 704-769-2261

Mike Casagrande: 704-769-2263

Clint Dowell: 704-769-2258

Karen Harmon:  704-769-2262

Patrick Lowder: 704-769-2265

Chris Nelson: 704-769-2256


2014 Halibut Quotas

Fins Still Moving

Fins Still Moving

The International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) completed its 90th Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA on January 17, with Dr. James Balsiger of Juneau, Alaska, presiding as Chair. More than 250 halibut industry stakeholders attended the meeting, with over 60 more participating via the web. All of the Commission’s public and administrative sessions during the meeting were open to the public and broadcast on the web.

 The Commission is recommending to the governments of Canada and the United States catch limits for 2014 totaling 27,515,000 pounds. The Commission is responding to stock challenges with a risk-based precautionary approach and review of the current harvest policy to ensure the best possible advice. Accordingly, it has set catch limits that should achieve a lower coastwide harvest rate than the 2013 catch limits of 31,028,000 pounds. The Commission also addressed other regulatory issues and took actions regarding assessment survey expansion, bycatch management, and follow-up from the 2012 IPHC performance review.

The Commission approved a season of March 8 – November 7, 2014, for the U.S. and Canadian Individual Quota fisheries. Seasons will commence at noon local time on March 8 and terminate at noon local time on November 7, 2014.


SeafoodS.com
will be your most discerning and direct point of distribution this coming season. We ship directly from the fishermen and the quality is unsurpassed in the marketplace!